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The Two-Way
8:04 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Suspected Nazi War Criminals Living In Limbo In U.S.

John (Ivan) Kalymon talks about his deportation outside his Troy, Mich., home in this 2009 photo. Kalymon is one of at least 10 suspected Nazi war criminals who remains in the United States despite attempts to deport him.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 2:38 pm

At least 10 people suspected of committing Nazi war crimes were never deported from the U.S. despite losing the American citizenship they gained when they immigrated, The Associated Press reports. A main cause of the delay is simple: Their European homelands don't want them back.

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The Two-Way
7:28 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Fiery Explosions Rock Florida Propane Tank Plant

A Blue Rhino propane gas plant burns, as seen in a frame grab from an AP video. The fire sent at least seven workers to the hospital Monday night.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 11:23 am

A series of fiery explosions ravaged a Blue Rhino propane gas plant in central Florida's Lake County late Monday night, forcing nearby residents to be evacuated. The detonations reportedly lasted for some 30 minutes and were heard as far as 10 miles away. A fire at the plant raged into the early morning hours.

Update at 11:10 a.m. ET: Work Continues; No Sign Of Sabotage

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Book News: Campaigner For Jane Austen Banknote Deluged With Threats

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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It's All Politics
6:33 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Abortion Drives Bigger Wedge Between Red And Blue States

Texas, where abortion-rights battles took place in July at the state capitol, is part of an eight-state region that has gotten more conservative on the issue.
Eric Gay AP

Regional disparities over the abortion issue have grown during the past two decades, leading to an ever widening gulf between the nation's most conservative and most liberal regions.

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Research News
4:20 am
Tue July 30, 2013

For Some Mammals It's One Love, But Reasons Still Unclear

Golden lion tamarins are one species that are largely monogamous.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 11:11 am

Fewer than 10 percent of all mammal species are monogamous. In fact, biologists have long disagreed over why monogamy exists at all. That's the subject of two studies published this week — and they come to different conclusions.

Animals that leave the most offspring win the race to spread their genes and to perpetuate their lineage. So for most mammals, males have a simple strategy: Mate with as many females as possible.

"Monogamy is a problem," says Dieter Lukas, a biologist at Cambridge University. "Why should a male keep to one female?"

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