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Sports
3:38 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

A PR Person's How-To Guide For Spinning College Sports

The leg injury to Louisville guard Kevin Ware has been a rallying point for fans nationwide. But the University of Louisville is hoping to avoid looking like they're taking advantage.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 5:42 pm

The Final Four games at the NCAA men's college basketball tournament on Saturday were just the latest in a week that's been eventful — and unpredictable.

Bettina Cornwell, a marketing expert at the University of Oregon, says universities and colleges like to be ready with their public relations strategies. But sometimes you just can't plan for sports.

How To Be Cinderella

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The Salt
12:40 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Apparently, Some People Can't Be Bothered With Food

Nestle makes a range of products under the Boost brand marketed as liquid nutritional supplements or meal replacements. But nutritionists say they can't compete with all the benefits of eating real food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 12:37 pm

We're accustomed to offbeat food ideas here at The Salt. But even we had to pause over recent headlines about a guy who bragged about finding a way around eating.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Young Staffer's Death Binds U.S. Embassy, Journalists

An Afghan police officer stands guard near the site where a suicide bomb attack took the life of five Americans, including 25-year-old Foreign Service officer Anne Smedinghoff, in Afghanistan on Saturday.
Arghand Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 10:50 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Remembering Anne Smedinghoff

Death comes with the territory when you work in conflict zones. On sometimes a daily basis, those of us who have worked in Iraq and Afghanistan in particular have filed stories with headlines like, "Four troops killed during insurgent attack," or "IED kills 10 civilians and wounds six."

It's a blur of numbers and uniforms. When we get word of an incident, we scramble to determine what happened, the nationality of the victims and any other pertinent details. But it's all very anonymous and impersonal, most of the time. It's reporting. It's work.

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Europe
9:54 am
Sun April 7, 2013

The River Thames, A Not-So-Secret Treasure Trove

Found objects from the Thames. Top row: a 1687 tin halfpenny, a Victorian clay pipe, a gold ring, a Victorian ring. Middle row: a decorated medieval button, a Victorian clay pipe, an 1830 George IV farthing, a Georgian military button. Bottom row: a Hooper Brewery stopper, a sailor's bag lock, a French Jacob pipe bowl and a child's toy clay pipe bowl. Note: objects not to scale.
Nick Stevens Thames and Field

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:45 pm

In the United Kingdom, British archaeologists have made a number of significant discoveries as of late, from the battered remains of King Richard III — found buried beneath a parking lot — to, more recently, a 14th-century burial ground for plague victims in London.

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Europe
6:52 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Young Greeks Find 'The Math Just Doesn't Work' Amid Crisis

"In Europe, we're trying to save banks by sacrificing an entire generation — my generation," says Marios Kyriakou, 24.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 4:23 pm

The latest statistics show Greece and Spain with the highest unemployment rates in the eurozone, both at more than 26 percent. For young Greeks, the numbers are much worse: Nearly 60 percent of people under 25 are out of work, a figure that is expected to rise.

These aren't just numbers for 24-year-old Marios Kyriakou, who was recently sipping a sweet espresso freddo at an arty cafe in his neighborhood. He says he's even had to cut back on that small pleasure.

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